Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

I’m reading Moby Dick (the Collector’s Library Edition) as part of a personal challenge to read several books that are considered “classics”. I’ve been delighted and surprised at the contents of the book. I’m only 20% in. At first I tried listening to the audiobook version but the text was too dense for me to grasp the detail, so I bought a beautiful printed version and settled down to read at least one chapter a day. Herman Melville’s words reflect a philosophy of tolerance of social differences that rings true for today. So wise! I find myself wanting to lift text from it and paste it to Facebook and say, hey everyone, read this, this was written in 1851, and they were having the same social problems related to cultural differences we have today.…

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The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery

The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery

This book, the physical one that belongs to me, has had a hurly-burly journey. The first time I picked it up, well, actually the time I bought it and paid full price for it, and then, I abandoned it. And then, I gave it to my local charity shop, where I noticed it remaining on their shelf for months. And then, I bought it back again.! Only heaven knows why. And then, I read it. How could I have missed its beauty the first time round. …

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The Year of Reading Dangerously by Andy Miller

The Year of Reading Dangerously by Andy Miller

A Bookish Observation: Andy Miller’s book, The Year of Reading Dangerously – How Fifty Great Books (And Two Not So Great Ones) Saved My life, has had a profound effect on me and my reading. I listened to it as an Audiobook from Audible.com, narrated by the author himself, then I purchased the hardback because it’s a book I knew I would want to refer to again and again. And then I bought the Kindle eBook too, because it’s nice to have it easily accessible in my library in the “Cloud”. Mr Miller’s narration put a smile on my face immediately. He has a self effacing humour typical of British people. He made the discussion light hearted but serious all at the same time.…

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Garrison Gage Mysteries by Scott William Carter

Garrison Gage Mysteries by Scott William Carter

Arriving at a book is a journey, the author’s journey, and then, the readers’ journey. Some steps are short and instantaneous, others are so very convoluted one wonders about the thinking process and its miracle. I discover many authors via book bloggers or through books read. (I find music this way too.) Rarely do I discover a book via word-of-mouth because my taste in books differ greatly from my friends and family. I discovered the Garrison Gage Mystery series through a book blogger whose name, unfortunately, escapes me. I keep reminding myself to take note of the source of my discoveries, but there are so many, I’m discouraged by the time leakage. I must become more disciplined because book bloggers are so generous with their information that the least I can do is give them credit for leading the way.…

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First Impressions by Charlie Lovett

First Impressions by Charlie Lovett

My first impression of Charlie Lovett’s “First Impressions” was positive and that impression played out well throughout the book. I wasn’t disappointed. It’s a book about books, one of my favorite genres. The story switches chapter by chapter between Jane Austen’s world and the life of a present day character, Sophie Collingwood. It’s easy to read and flows at a good pace, not too fast and not too slow.…

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