Category: Non-Fiction

A Bookish Observation: The first time I heard Randy Pausch’s “The Last Lecture”, about ten years ago, I was blown away by the wisdom he shared. Recently I came across the hardback edition 2008 at my local charity shop, so I snapped it up, and started reading it immediately. The impact it had on me, this time around, was different …

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A Bookish Observation: Bill Bryson is one of my favourite authors. His prose makes everything he writes so very readable. He writes in a way that enables we “everymen” to easily access historical and scientific facts. (I’ve listened to several audiobooks where Bill Bryson reads his own work, so when I read his books, I can hear his voice and imagine his smile while I read.)

Recently I saw the beautifully made movie “All is True” which was about William Shakespeare, and I found it very interesting, so when I tripped over Bill Bryson’s book, Shakespeare, at my local charity shop, I snapped it up. I started reading and two days later I’d finished it. What a good read.

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Until I saw Ryder Carroll’s book listed on Amazon, the idea of bullet journaling was unknown to me, but after I’d read the book’s description I understood immediately what it meant, because it reminded me of “Committee Action Minutes”, often used at brain storming meetings in the workplace. (Action Minutes, unlike the usual Minutes, record only items that require action and are short, and bullet pointed.)

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A Bookish Observation: I’ll start by saying that Susan Hill’s two books-about-books, Jacob’s Room is Full of Books and Howard’s End is on the Landing, are two of my very favourite books-about-books. They are so good, I’ve made sure I’ve got the printed versions, and they take pride of place on our bookshelves.

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The Book of Forgotten Authors is a book about books, one of my favourite genres. I have the hardback edition and, when I’ve finished reading it, will take up one book space on my bookshelf. My bookshelf space is precious, and it is only those “special” books that get to sit within it. The Books about Books genre takes up about twelve spaces on my shelves, because they are books that will call out to me over the years, and I’ll dive into their pages occasionally, to reacquaint myself with a gem.

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A Bookish Observation: The minute I saw Tom Griffith‘s book description on Amazon I knew his book was a book I must read. It was listed on Kindle Unlimited, but I wasn’t a subscriber. I’d considered joining Amazon’s eBook library previously, so I subscribed and picked up “The Art of Time Travel“. (Later I purchased the book, because with Kindle Unlimited you have to return the book eventually.)

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My GoodReads rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is a collection of short pieces about the book that had a huge personal impact on the writing life of well known Australian and New Zealand authors; the book that “made” them.  It was soooo very good. It led me down new pathways, I learned about authors I was unfamiliar with, and books too. I found it at the Gleebooks’ Sydney Writers Festival Bookshop, which is always a source of unique treasures. I’ve “eaten” this book up. My huge TBR list has grown and grown, and my knowledge of quality reading has been enhanced. Gush gush, I know; lovers of of story, read it, you won’t be disappointed.

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A wonderful slow read of slow travel. I’m so sad I’ve finished the book. The good news is, Mr Macfarlane has written other books and they’re waiting for me.

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A Bookish Observation: Andy Miller’s book, The Year of Reading Dangerously – How Fifty Great Books (And Two Not So Great Ones) Saved My life, has had a profound effect on me and my reading. I listened to it as an Audiobook from Audible.com, narrated by the author himself, then I purchased the hardback because it’s a book I knew I would want to refer to again and again. And then I bought the Kindle eBook too, because it’s nice to have it easily accessible in my library in the “Cloud”. Mr Miller’s narration put a smile on my face immediately. He has a self effacing humour typical of British people. He made the discussion light hearted but serious all at the same time.

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A bookish observation: I’ve been following along with Derek Murphy’s blog from his website CreativeIndie for a few months. It’s full of interesting insights about eBook publishing and cover design. His conversational writing style is clear and easily accessible, so when I realised he had published several books covering self-publishing topics, I loaded down four of them:

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