Category: Favourite Genres

“Edinburgh Twilight” is set in Scotland’s city of Edinburgh in 1881, when the police force was in its infancy and forensic science was practically nonexistent. The book’s description of Edinburgh gives me the impression that, if you went looking, you’d be able to find all the landmarks mentioned in the story, if they still exist. In the founding days of the Police Force, collecting evidence and clues was haphazard and depended on the skill of the Detective, the co-operation of his colleagues, reliable information obtained through goodwill, and luck.

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I’ve read sixteen of the seventeen books available in the Kincaid and James Mystery series.  I’ve read them, one after the other, straight through; it was like reading one long novel, and enjoying every moment. I really like the characters, and the plot has just the right pace for me; a medium pace, the pace of a mystery.

Soon, I’ll be starting book seventeen, Garden of Lamentations, that said, the books sitting on my side-table are looking quite neglected, so I may redirect my attention to some non-fiction for a little while.

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A Bookish Observation of a Favourite Genre, Nature Writing: Nature writing means the reader can sit comfortably in their reading space, warm and comfortable, but at the same time experience the minunate of drops of rain and their sound and sight, reflections on the water, the different lights flowing over the landscape, ripples on a pond in the moonlight, and so much more.

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A Bookish Observation: I’ll start by saying that Susan Hill’s two books-about-books, Jacob’s Room is Full of Books and Howard’s End is on the Landing, are two of my very favourite books-about-books. They are so good, I’ve made sure I’ve got the printed versions, and they take pride of place on our bookshelves.

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The Book of Forgotten Authors is a book about books, one of my favourite genres. I have the hardback edition and, when I’ve finished reading it, will take up one book space on my bookshelf. My bookshelf space is precious, and it is only those “special” books that get to sit within it. The Books about Books genre takes up about twelve spaces on my shelves, because they are books that will call out to me over the years, and I’ll dive into their pages occasionally, to reacquaint myself with a gem.

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My GoodReads rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is a collection of short pieces about the book that had a huge personal impact on the writing life of well known Australian and New Zealand authors; the book that “made” them.  It was soooo very good. It led me down new pathways, I learned about authors I was unfamiliar with, and books too. I found it at the Gleebooks’ Sydney Writers Festival Bookshop, which is always a source of unique treasures. I’ve “eaten” this book up. My huge TBR list has grown and grown, and my knowledge of quality reading has been enhanced. Gush gush, I know; lovers of of story, read it, you won’t be disappointed.

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A wonderful slow read of slow travel. I’m so sad I’ve finished the book. The good news is, Mr Macfarlane has written other books and they’re waiting for me.

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A bookish observation: My first introduction to Sandy Mackinnon’s writing was “The Unlikely Voyage of Jack de Crow”. This is still one of my favourite books. When I heard he had written another book, I think he has only written two, I just had to get “The Well at the World’s End”.

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A bookish observation: The Unlikely Voyage of Jack de Crow” 1st Edition, by AJ Mackinnon, practically leapt off the shelf into my hands. It was during one of my regular visits to the local library. There it was, in the travel genre section.

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