Category: Bookish Observations

The Book of Forgotten Authors by Christopher Fowler

The Book of Forgotten Authors is a book about books, one of my favourite genres. I have the hardback edition and, when I’ve finished reading it, will take up one book space on my bookshelf. My bookshelf space is precious, and it is only those “special” books that get to sit within it. The Books about Books genre takes up about twelve spaces on my shelves, because they are books that will call out to me over the years, and I’ll dive into their pages occasionally, to reacquaint myself with a gem.

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The Art of Time Travel – Historians and their Craft

A Bookish Observation: The minute I saw Tom Griffith‘s book description on Amazon I knew his book was a book I must read. It was listed on Kindle Unlimited, but I wasn’t a subscriber. I’d considered joining Amazon’s eBook library previously, so I subscribed and picked up “The Art of Time Travel“. (Later I purchased the book, because with Kindle Unlimited you have to return the book eventually.)

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The Rock by Robert Daws

When this book came to my notice, I liked the idea of a mystery set in Gibraltar. I’d visited Gibraltar, briefly c1993, so I had a sense of its atmosphere. It wasn’t my intention to read it straight away.

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The Book That Made Me: edited by Judith Ridge

This book is a collection of short pieces about the book that had a huge personal impact on the writing life of well known Australian and New Zealand authors; the book that “made” them.  It was soooo very good. It led me down new pathways …

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The Durra Durra Saga by J.A.Wells

Thurlow Book One of the Durra Durra Saga

For those of you have been following along with me and my journey with the manuscripts of J.A.Wells’ work, you will know that I believe he is a tremendous storyteller. I’ve been closely associated with his work, assisting with proof reading, a little mentoring, designing book covers, and eventually I will be joining in the process of John self publishing and promoting his work. My close association with John and my technical assistance are anchored in my admiration for John’s work, both his writing, his art and most importantly his creative energy. I have so much “serious” fun contributing my technical and administrative skills to his process. Maybe one day, if all goes well, his work will be discovered by many many readers and eventually will become a best seller. The Durra Durra Saga is his second manuscript, the first being The Merry Millionaire, two others are near completion. After the editing process is complete, the world will be introduced to a new voice in the literary world. J.A.Wells’ journey is one that the Artuccino Team, that is, John Challenor and I, Diane Challenor, feel privileged to be part of. Here’s a little blurb of J.A.Wells’ intriguing two part saga, full of mystery and adventure, The Durra Durra Saga: Book one – Intrigue and Injustice and book two – Insurgence and Inheritance:

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An Unlamented Death by William Savage

A bookish observation: Great storytelling! I love a good story with a visual impact. I don’t need car chases and graphic-anything, I just want to sit spell bound as the story unfolds; this story keeps you turning the page, gently. I’m looking forward to reading the next in the series. I loved its pace, its characters, its delivery of observations and revelations, with a little wisdom sprinkled here and there.

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The Merry Millionaire by J.A.Wells

Our world has changed in many ways, our European based cultures have become more reasonable and all inclusive of religious philosophies, racial and cultural differences and sexual orientation. Of course pockets of resistance still exist and resound through the voices and actions of the un-enlightened. That said, I have a certain conservative view of the world, so it was with hesitation that I decided to read this novel from this genre, which follows the journey of a “gay” character. The Captain is a very rich English gentleman, whose lifestyle could be looked upon today with a critical eye, in light of our society’s courageous attempt to protect the young.

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The Old Ways by Robert Macfarlane

A wonderful slow read of slow travel. I’m so sad I’ve finished the book. The good news is, Mr Macfarlane has written other books and they’re waiting for me.

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Case Histories by Kate Atkinson

Amazingly good. I didn’t want to put it down and I didn’t, until I finished the book, 48 hours after beginning, Phew! I’m not a fast reader but I found this a real page turner. It isn’t a thriller, but it’s a fantastic mystery. I read it and listened to it. The narrator of the audiobook was excellent. It won’t be long before I read the next one in the series. I just have to catch my breath first.

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The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery

I’m so pleased I didn’t miss this one. This is a book that could make a positive difference to the perception of a reader, particularly a young adult, who picks it up, connects with the story, and absorbs its treasure trove of wisdom; turning a desert into a garden of beautiful flowers. At least, I’d like to believe it would.

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