Category: Bookish Observations

Laidlaw by William McIlvanny

I read and enjoyed this book in 2019. I’d abandoned the audiobook back in 2013 after listening to the first chapter and thinking that the Scottish accent of the narrator (William McIlvanny) was a little too dense for my late night listening (before dropping off to sleep). This year, 2019, I purchased the eBook edition, and matched the audiobook with it, and then found I could follow the story more easily. I was determined to read the story.

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The Naturalist by Andrew Mayne

If you enjoy thrillers, this is a good one. For me, it was all I could do to get through to the end; it was harrowing. Harrowing is not my favourite thing, but there was something intriguing about the story that made me “go with it”. I really liked the main character, Dr Theo Cray, a Computational Biologist, and I loved his scientific method of solving the puzzle, however it’s much too “thrilling” for me so I won’t go for book two in the series. If you enjoy a thriller you’ll very likely enjoy this story.

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Edinburgh Twilight by Carole Lawrence

“Edinburgh Twilight” is set in Scotland’s city of Edinburgh in 1881, when the police force was in its infancy and forensic science was practically nonexistent. The book’s description of Edinburgh gives me the impression that, if you went looking, you’d be able to find all the landmarks mentioned in the story, if they still exist. In the founding days of the Police Force, collecting evidence and clues was haphazard and depended on the skill of the Detective, the co-operation of his colleagues, reliable information obtained through goodwill, and luck.

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The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch

A Bookish Observation: The first time I heard Randy Pausch’s “The Last Lecture”, about ten years ago, I was blown away by the wisdom he shared. Recently I came across the hardback edition 2008 at my local charity shop, so I snapped it up, and started reading it immediately. The impact it had on me, this time around, was different …

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Shakespeare by Bill Bryson

A Bookish Observation: Bill Bryson is one of my favourite authors. His prose makes everything he writes so very readable. He writes in a way that enables we “everymen” to easily access historical and scientific facts. (I’ve listened to several audiobooks where Bill Bryson reads his own work, so when I read his books, I can hear his voice and imagine his smile while I read.)

Recently I saw the beautifully made movie “All is True” which was about William Shakespeare, and I found it very interesting, so when I tripped over Bill Bryson’s book, Shakespeare, at my local charity shop, I snapped it up. I started reading and two days later I’d finished it. What a good read.

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The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carroll

Until I saw Ryder Carroll’s book listed on Amazon, the idea of bullet journaling was unknown to me, but after I’d read the book’s description I understood immediately what it meant, because it reminded me of “Committee Action Minutes”, often used at brain storming meetings in the workplace. (Action Minutes, unlike the usual Minutes, record only items that require action and are short, and bullet pointed.)

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The Suspect by Michael Robotham

“The Suspect” by Michael Robotham is the first in his Joe O’Loughlin Series. It’s a thriller; a real page turner.

My journey to this book was bit convoluted like so many of my journeys to books. This series was brought to my attention by a good friend with whom I often swap bookish observations. My friend knows I’m not too keen on edgy, graphic, psychological thrillers, but she thought I may enjoy the series, so she recommended I give “The Suspect” a try.

Let me say, I abandon books easily, so I have no difficulty picking up a book and giving it a try, and then, without guilt, I can …

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A Favourite Series – Kincaid and James Mysteries

I’ve read sixteen of the seventeen books available in the Kincaid and James Mystery series.  I’ve read them, one after the other, straight through; it was like reading one long novel, and enjoying every moment. I really like the characters, and the plot has just the right pace for me; a medium pace, the pace of a mystery.

Soon, I’ll be starting book seventeen, Garden of Lamentations, that said, the books sitting on my side-table are looking quite neglected, so I may redirect my attention to some non-fiction for a little while.

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Nature Writing, a favourite genre

A Bookish Observation of a Favourite Genre, Nature Writing: Nature writing means the reader can sit comfortably in their reading space, warm and comfortable, but at the same time experience the minunate of drops of rain and their sound and sight, reflections on the water, the different lights flowing over the landscape, ripples on a pond in the moonlight, and so much more.

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The Third Man and Other Stories by Graham Greene

When I read a book on my List of Betterment, I feel like I’ve given myself access to a piece of writing that has held the attention of many readers for a very very long period of time. I want to know why that is so

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